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From WWI to ISIS, Genocide Casts a Long Shadow

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Old 15 Oct 15, 17:13   #1 (permalink)
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Post From WWI to ISIS, Genocide Casts a Long Shadow

LANCASTER, Pa. (Fandm.edu)Genocide never fully succeeds in eradicating a people, no matter how much its perpetrators destroy. They always leave behind evidencedocuments, memories, and human remainsto inform future generations of their atrocities,Armenian Genocide scholar Khatchig Mouradiansaid.

Genocide does not end when the killing stops, Armenian genocide scholar Khatchig Mouradian said. ‘[It] casts a very long shadow that keeps affecting the victims and the perpetrators, through years and decades, and often through generations.’ (Photo: Eric Forberger)

Speaking to an engrossed audience at Franklin and Marshall College, during the Oct. 1Common Hour, a community discussion held each Thursday during the academic year, Mouradian talked about atrocities that occurred 100 years apart in the same region of the world.

“The 21st century is already known as a century of turbulence, as a century of refugees, especially in the Middle East,” said Mouradian, program coordinator of the Armenian Genocide Program at Rutgers University’s Center for the Study of Genocide, Conflict Resolution and Human Rights.

Mouradian, who teaches history and sociology at Rutgers, said to understand what genocide means for the future generations of the victimsthose who were not murdered but were exiled from their homelandsand the perpetrators who not only murdered but stole from the victims, is almost incomprehensible.

“It’s really difficult to think about the long-term challenges that this particular problem presents,” he said. “Violence, genocide and mass atrocities does not end when the killing stops, when the violence stops. [It] casts a very long shadow that keeps affecting the victims and the perpetrators, through years and decades, and often through generations.”

Mouradian suggested looking to the past to try to understand today’s atrocities perpetrated by ISIS, the militant Islamic group of Sunnis who have slaughtered Shiites, Kurds, members of other ethnic groups and westerners in Syria and Iraq.

Specifically, he pointed to the plights of the Armenians in that same region in 1915, when the Ottoman government began the systematic extermination of Armenians from their homeland in what is today the Republic of Turkey.

To distill further the history so people could relate to the larger issue of the Armenian Genocide, Mouradianused personal stories: two young Armenian women, sisters Siphora and Nurista, who were midwives in their hometown from the late 19th century until 1922, when they were exiled.

“The two sisters together delivered most of the babies in that city,” Mouradian said. “One sister, Siphora, delivered 4,271 children.”

An Armenian refugee camp in Syria 1915. (Photo: American Committee for Relief in the Near East)

The sisters left behind journals, which Mouradian recently obtained, that tell their story. They were exiled to Aleppo, Syria, where ISIS commits atrocities today. When they arrived in Aleppo, the sisters continued their midwifery.

“This was a period when they were surrounded by thousands upon thousands of survivors of the Armenian genocide, and they were delivering their children,” Mouradian said.

An Armenian who grew up in Lebanon, Mouradian told of a visit to Turkey where he met an Armenian man. A photo of the scholar with the man appeared on the screen and Mouradian, in citing an ethnic resemblance, said, “This man could almost be my uncle, my father.”

Cecilia Plaza, a junior sociology major, welcomed Mouradian’s discussion as “right down my alley” because her field of study is human rights.

“I thought his perspective was really interesting,” Plaza said. “He told stories with photographs and made it personal.”




LANCASTER, Pa. (Fandm.edu)Genocide never fully succeeds in eradicating a people, no matter how much its perpetrators destroy. They always leave behind evidencedocuments, memories, and human remainsto inform future generations of their atrocities,Armenian Genocide scholar Khatchig Mouradiansaid. Genocide does not end when the killing stops, Armenian genocide scholar Khatchig Mouradian said. ‘[It] casts a very long shadow that keeps affecting the victims and the perpetrators, through years and decades, and often through generations.’ (Photo: Eric Forberger) Speaking to an engrossed audience at Franklin and Marshall College, during the Oct. 1Common Hour, a community discussion held each Thursday during the academic year, Mouradian talked about atrocities that occurred 100 years apart in the same region of the world. “The 21st century is already known as a century of turbulence, as a century of refugees, especially in the Middle East,” said Mouradian, program coordinator of the Armenian Genocide Program at Rutgers University’s Center for the Study of Genocide, Conflict Resolution and Human Rights. Mouradian, who teaches history and sociology at Rutgers, said to understand what genocide means for the future generations of the victimsthose who were not murdered but were exiled from their homelandsand the perpetrators who not only murdered but stole from [...]
LANCASTER, Pa. (Fandm.edu)Genocide never fully succeeds in eradicating a people, no matter how much its perpetrators destroy. They always leave behind evidencedocuments, memories, and human remainsto inform future generations of their atrocities,Armenian Genocide scholar Khatchig Mouradiansaid. Genocide does not end when the killing stops, Armenian genocide scholar Khatchig Mouradian said. ‘[It] casts a very long shadow that keeps affecting the victims and the perpetrators, through years and decades, and often through generations.’ (Photo: Eric Forberger) Speaking to an engrossed audience at Franklin and Marshall College, during the Oct. 1Common Hour, a community discussion held each Thursday during the academic year, Mouradian talked about atrocities that occurred 100 years apart in the same region of the world. “The 21st century is already known as a century of turbulence, as a century of refugees, especially in the Middle East,” said Mouradian, program coordinator of the Armenian Genocide Program at Rutgers University’s Center for the Study of Genocide, Conflict Resolution and Human Rights. Mouradian, who teaches history and sociology at Rutgers, said to understand what genocide means for the future generations of the victimsthose who were not murdered but were exiled from their homelandsand the perpetrators who not only murdered but stole from [...]
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